The Playground and the Classroom

Our experience here is born in the spirit of play! Our true nature is one that is completely free, unlimited, creative, and powerful. It is from that true state that we decide to ultimately express ourselves here in the physical experience.

And yet, here on Earth we often go through experiences that seem far from playful. We are engaged by what seems to be the “hard constraints” or “hard rules” of our world: a knife will always cut, resources will always be finite, and the body will always die. Indeed, there is profound growth opportunity available to the spirit when it is “forced” (apparently forced) to face these “hard constraints.” Such experiences help us experientially “learn”: we learn how to deal with circumstance, we learn how to make choices, we even learn more about who we are. Even through and beyond our local reality, there are “spiritual laws” in place that help guide us through growth that is beneficial for us- and sometimes that process can be extremely painful.

So is life more like a playground, or a classroom?

The following two statements are both true and do not contradict:

  1. Nothing is required of us. The universe is born out of a desire to play, to exercise our great creative natures in a unique way, just for the sake of it.
  2. There is meaning and value in integrating challenging experiences and adding to Creation. Sometimes the “spiritual laws” in place end up guiding us through what seem to be very difficult experiences for the sake of growth.

The classroom is in the playground.

Even when you are in class, you can play! No matter what circumstance you find yourself in, your true nature remains unharmed and shining and joyful! And when you can fully let go of the burden you have assigned to your assignment, and get in touch with and express that ever-abiding true nature, often the lesson is ended- and you can now be full of even more joy than you were before you playfully went to class.

The Playground and the Classroom

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